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Tangata, inclusive innovation!

11 February 2020

 

At BNP Paribas Cardif, innovation is (also) working for inclusion. It was therefore natural for us to support the Tangata initiative, a solidarity initiative created by Emmanuelle Fenard, Head of "maison entrepreneurs &Co" at BNP Paribas, former Head of Marketing at BNP Paribas Cardif France.

“Making insurance accessible to the largest possible number of people”, our company is committed to having a positive impact on society with this ambitious mission. An inclusive policy has therefore been implemented for vulnerable members of society, notably the 20 million people affected by disability in France. Our initiative is not limited to advancing the employment and professional integration of these women and men. It goes far beyond that, as evidenced by our “Act For Impact” social entrepreneur label, our partnership with the Handi Tech Trophy, which rewards the inventors of inclusive technologies, and the work we do with the association e-Nable for supporting families of children affected by agenesis*.

 

Leisure for all

To move further towards more inclusion, we also rely on the capacity for innovation of our employees, by encouraging and supporting their initiatives through an intrapreneurship program. This is how the Tangata project was born. The ambition of Emmanuelle Fenard, who designed it, was to accelerate the development of leisure activities accessible to all types of disabilities. Her solution? Creating a site to connect all the people concerned, their caregivers, and all the actors who respond to their needs: associations, companies, start-ups, etc. Tangata acts as a visibility lever for these organisations. The platform helps them deploy their offerings by increasing their awareness and giving them access to a network of partners, while guaranteeing the quality of services through the “Act for Impact” label. And, as it has been designed for them and is easy to use, the site allows people with disabilities to come out of their isolation and organise their leisure activities quickly and easily. Let’s take an example In just a few clicks, users can locate an activity, check its accessibility with respect to their needs, and consult the opinions of the Tangata community!

*born with one or more limb abnormalities.

 

 “I’ve been involved personally for a long time in initiatives relating to the social and solidarity sector. I’m proud to take it further today with my Tangata project.”

Emmanuelle Fenard, head of "maison entrepreneurs &Co" at BNP Paribas.

 


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Offer Catalogue

Discover BNP Paribas Cardif core offer in our interactive catalogue.

Access to online version, click here.

Please find here the Spanish, Italian and French versions.

For offline versions, click here from your iPad or Android tablet.

 

 

 


Chief Actuary, Chief Financial Officer, Deputy Chief Executive Officer

 

Education :

Vincent Sussfeld is a graduate of the EM Lyon Business School (1995), the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (1997) and the Ecole Nationale d'Administration (2001 - Mandela graduating cohort).


 

Career: 

He began his career at Allianz France in 2001 as head of CSR, subsequently leading the insurer's transformation and innovation project as part of the property and casualty insurance claims department.

He joined BNP Paribas Cardif in 2007 as head of public affairs. He then became deputy CEO of the SBI Life joint venture in India (2009) and subsequently sales director for international markets (2012). He has been deputy head of Asia alongside Xavier Guilmineau since the beginning of 2015.

He was Head of Asia from July 2015 to January 2019.


 

Today:

Vincent Sussfeld is Chief Actuary, Chief Financial Officer, Deputy Chief Executive Officer. He has been a member of the Executive Committee of BNP Paribas Cardif since July 2015.

 

Chief Risk Officer

 

Education :

Murielle Puron Chambord is a graduate of the Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Reims business school (NEOMA Business School).

Career:

Having gained Audit experience at Deloitte, she joined the Crédit Lyonnais Group where, over the next 10 years, she occupied a series of accounting and financial posts with the bank and the 'bad bank' structure known as the Consortium de Réalisation.

Murielle Puron Chambord joined the BNP Paribas Group in 2001 as head of the in-house accounting firm for Group subsidiaries BNP Paribas Expertise EIG, and was then appointed Head of Financial Reporting and Consolidation at BNP Paribas Group in 2003.

In 2006, she joined BNP Paribas Cardif as Chief Accountant, moving on to Deputy Chief Financial Officer in 2011 and General Secretary for Corporate Functions in 2013.

Today:

Murielle Puron Chambord is Chief Risk Officer2. In January 2016, she was appointed as a member of the company's Executive Committee.

 

Inclusive management, a new priority for businesses

30 January 2020

 

What if diversity is the key to future top performance? A growing number of businesses are convinced of this and are taking action to promote a management policy that includes their employees. The challenge is not only to respect individual differences, but to make these differences a core part of transformation and turn them into a collective asset, a source of innovation and progress. Let’s decipher this promising trend.

 

When the main French employers' trade-union (MEDEF) released its barometer describing how the nation perceived equal opportunity in 2018, the rate of employees expressing fears of discrimination in the workplace fell below 50% for the very first time. "This is the result of initiatives undertaken for several years by an increasing number of businesses which have made inclusion one of their human resources management priorities. The challenge is to guarantee their employees equal treatment based on their skills and performance, regardless of differences involving origin, gender, age, civil status, political or religious beliefs, sexual orientation, place of residence, state of health, physical appearance, etc." explains Laurent Depond, former Chief Diversity Officer at Orange, who advises a large number of organisations on workplace inclusion issues.

 

Liberté, égalité, diversity

The phenomenon was sparked a few decades ago by American multinationals in response to growing legal and regulatory measures against all forms of discrimination. It then spread to Europe where it was adapted to local cultures. "There is a specifically French vision of the concept, which focuses very sharply on creating the conditions for equal opportunity, whereas the UK model is based more on the freedom to express singularity" says Laurent Depond. But it’s no longer a mere question of businesses complying with administrative constraints to avoid legal, financial and image risks. "They’ve understood that diversity is a performance factor and a lever for transformation" sums up Laurent Depond. A factor with measurable effectiveness: Sodexo, which is highly active in promoting diversity, conducted an in-house survey of its managerial teams across more than 80 countries. The results showed that teams with a gender mix of between 40 and 60% achieved better business results than others.

 

Inclusion as a source of creativity

In an era of permanent change, adapting and developing involves attracting a wide range of employee profiles with varied experiences and cultures and making them work efficiently as a team so that involvement and creativity is stimulated when diverse points of view are confronted. On the other hand, an overly standardised environment stifles individual talents... when it doesn’t scare them away. "An employee who feels excluded from the work group will tend to withdraw further, resulting in a loss of information, performance and motivation, or even a desire to eventually leave the company. For instance, it’s no coincidence that in France, according to a study  by  l'Autre Cercle and Défenseur des Droits (independent administrative organisations) , homosexuals change employers twice as often as heterosexuals” , points out Laurent Depond. It is therefore no surprise to see businesses committing to inclusion.

 

More or less committed companies

 In France, nearly 3,900 organisations have made this commitment a reality by signing the diversity charter. Initiated in 2004, this charter helps organisations implement hands-on action and move forward through innovative practices, encouraging them, for instance, to adopt a reference text laying down the main lines of their diversity policy and measuring/monitoring tools. There are, however, several degrees of maturity in the processes undertaken.  "Sometimes they're just cosmetic, with little or no concrete action taken.  In other cases, businesses tackle various sources of discrimination, such as disability, while ignoring others like sexual orientation or religion.  Some of them adopt a compassionate posture. The most advanced among them promote transformational diversity: inclusion is then made an integral part of their strategy and supported by their managers, including at the highest level " explains Laurent Depond.. What about BNP Paribas Cardif?  "It’s among the top of the class, even though it operates in the bancassurance sector, which is traditionally reluctant to value difference.

 

BNP Paribas Cardif aims to set an example

"Our company has achieved dual "Diversity and Professional Equality" certification by AFNOR” confirms Catherine Jacquemin, Responsable Diversité et Inclusion BNP Paribas Cardif. These labels commit us to step up our efforts towards equal opportunity and fairness. They're not granted for life. Our best practices are challenged every two years! The diversity policy, launched more than 10 years ago, is both long-term and highly active:  "We also reap the benefits of our CEO Renaud Dumora’s personal involvement, as he believes deeply in the virtues of diversity and intends to make our company a world reference in this area ", adds Catherine Jacquemin. To achieve its goal, BNP Paribas Cardif is raising awareness and training its managers with a threefold objective: to make them fully aware of the importance of diversity and inclusion, broaden their knowledge, and encourage all concerned to adopt the right managerial stance.

 

“Diversity Managers” conferences

For the past two years, a series of "Diversity Managers" conferences has brought together BNP Paribas Cardif managers with internal and external experts to discuss sexist behaviour, sexual orientation, disability, religion, stereotypes and, in the near future, intergenerational collaboration. "Each conference is held during working hours (and not at lunchtime or after 6 p.m.) and attracts an average of 200 managers. They are "sponsored" by a member of the executive committee, and Renaud Dumora is always in attendance from start to finish," explains Catherine.

 

Training modules dedicated to diversity

To back up the conferences, BNP Paribas Cardif has added a diversity module to the training syllabus for its local managers.  "It empowers them to discuss stereotypes, company agreements relating to diversity and appropriate behaviour for an entire morning, and always ends in a lunch dedicated to disability," emphasises Catherine Jacquemin.  A second one-hour module has just been developed for senior executives and their management committees.

 

New approaches and new tools

Building on what’s already been achieved doesn’t only mean anchoring good practices in the corporate culture and adapting them to changes in the laws against discrimination at work. It also means fighting human nature, since we tend to homogenise our environment and thus avoid diversity for fear of others, difference, and the unknown. "We need to try and limit these natural biases in the decision-making process, for instance during recruitment, by setting objective selection criteria and taking collegial decisions, etc. We can also help managers by using new approaches that are based on neurosciences and cognitive sciences," concludes Laurent Depond.

The law on equality and citizenship dated 27 January 2017 obliges all companies with more than 300 employees to train their managers every 5 years in recruitment without discrimination.

Surveys show that 90% to 100% of attendees at BNP Paribas Cardif's "Diversity Managers Conferences" are satisfied.

79% of BNP Paribas Cardif employees believe that their company's management promotes diversity (source: GPS 2019).

 

That’s it!

"If we want to set an example in our market, we have to tackle all forms of discrimination without exception and give our managers the knowledge and attitudes that make them feel better equipped to work for diversity." Sophie Joyat, Head of Human Resources at BNP Paribas Cardif


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How does the insurance business adjust to the platformization?

20 January 2020

 

How does the insurance business adjust to the platformization? And what is at stake?

Find out what Wendy Wattebled, BNP Paribas Cardif start-up investment manager and Gil Cohen Managing Director EMEA at Open Legacy think about it


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The highlights of the BNP Paribas Cardif 2019 Symposium

15 January 2020

 

The 11th edition of the BNP Paribas Cardif Symposium took place in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on 5 and 6 December 2019. This event brought together BNP Paribas Cardif’s main international distribution partners around the theme of: Tackling hyper-digitalised environments...

 

More than 200 participants, from 28 countries, attended keynote talks delivered by renowned speakers. It was an opportunity to share the risks and opportunities - for the planet, the business, the city and even individuals - posed by digitalisation pushed to its limits, and also to take a lead faced with the challenges of hyper-digitalisation for the insurance industry.  “Digitalisation is contributing significantly to polluting our planet, but also our minds” said Renaud Dumora, CEO of BNP Paribas Cardif, in the introduction. “The key is to find the right balance between digitalisation, which is a source of opportunities and new services, and human interactions which remain crucial.”

 

1.      Hyper-digitalisation and business

Catherine Wood, founder and CEO of ARK Investment Management LLC (USA), emphasised the five major sources of innovation: blockchain, robotics, energy storage, artificial intelligence and genome sequencing. She said that “with hyper-digitalisation we are now observing transformations similar to those experienced with the discovery of electricity or the telephone.”.

“We’re not worried about job losses”, she noted. “Technology has a history of creating jobs.” Her conclusion is clear: “Any leader that does not take hold of Data and Artificial Intelligence to manage their business will responsible for its failure. If businesses do not adapt, they will lose their market. Be ready!”

 

 

2.      Hyper-digitalisation and the economy

For Christopher Pissarides, a Professor at the London School of Economics and recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2010, “hyper-digitalisation will disrupt our way of living and working”. The challenge? Making this revolution as inclusive as possible to improve the quality of life of all and to benefit as many people as possible. In the same way that some jobs benefit from new technologies, while others become obsolete, certain skills are becoming more valuable while others can be replaced. Thus two movements are developing in parallel. On the one hand, we have the agglomeration of activities, like in Silicon Valley, where tasks must be carried out by qualified employees. Businesses prefer positioning themselves where they have varied resources and skills at their disposal in order to perform better. On the other hand, we have e-commerce which allows platforms to sell from anywhere in the world. 

 

3.      Hyper-digitalisation and urbanisation 

Arjan Van Timmeren, Professor of Environmental Technology & Design at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, highlighted the acceleration of change in highly varied domains: energy, water, behaviour, sustainable development, etc. Digitalisation provides solutions - often more sustainable and efficient - to ensure that these changes succeed, even the most rapid ones. His advice? “To adopt new technologies with caution, taking into account people’s privacy, in particular.”

 

4.      Hyper-digitalisation and individuals

Ayesha Khanna, co-founder and CEO of ADDO AI (Singapore), used examples to demonstrate how hyper-digitalisation is already changing our lives, notably in cities like Singapore. “The question is not about knowing if new technologies work or not, but what their consequences are and how to use them well. To make good decisions, you need to remain human-centric. We should all be aware of the basics of artificial intelligence in order to grasp the issues at stake. The main threat is not the technology itself, but how to use it. It is all therefore a question of governance.

 

All the speakers agree that we are now at a crossroads. Our collective decisions and actions point us to a future that we have the ability to shape. This hyper-digitalisation implies new challenges but also great opportunities for society, businesses and people. Indeed, it lets us respond more quickly and more accurately to the expectations of citizens, employees and consumers, provided that the inherent risks are handled carefully and that the dignity of people and the future of the planet are maintained under all circumstances.